4 months ago, I read about Johan’s Nanino on Hack-A-Day, and thought it would be a great way to teach some folks how to etch their own circuit boards.  Although I’m increasingly shipping PCBs off to China, being able to etch your own boards is a valuable skill to have.  I’ve taught workshops on it in the past, and I’ve described the process on this blog.  Today, I set out to make a copy of Johan’s Nanino, but was almost immediately frustrated by the inability to manipulate and print the board file in a way that worked well for my process.  In the end, I redrew the thing using DipTrace.

Nanino ImprovedThe only change made to the original is the addition of a .1 uF capacitor on the DTR line of the FTDI header.  Some of the traces are a little closer together, but they’re still spaced out enough that etching this board is a cinch.

Here are the files:

Diptrace Schematic for Nanino

Diptrace PCB for Nanino

PDF of Nanino from the Back

You can use this PDF to etch directly.  No mirroring is needed.

Can be printed.  1200 DPI.

Can be printed. 1200 DPI.

Can be printed. 1200 DPI.  No mirror needed for etching.

Can be printed. 1200 DPI. No mirror needed for etching.

DXF of Nanino

And, because the original Nanino is licensed CC-BY-NC-SA, this one is also:
Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

 

It works!

It works!

Good toner transfer

Good toner transfer

The etch was drama-free

The etch was drama-free

Comments on this entry (9 comments)

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brunoip

you can put two mounting holes in it

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Having done this kind of thing myself, may I suggest making the pads quite a bit bigger? The etching step has obviously gone well, but when drilling and soldering, you may find the pads are too small. Take a look at the PCB I did for an ATmega32:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/anachrocomputer/2909284129/

Reply

I don’t have a good picture of the final product from the solder side, but drilling and soldering were trouble-free. I had correctly-sized drills, and aside from using the wrong drill size for the pin headers (at first), it wasn’t a problem to get a good drill hit with enough copper for a good solder joint.

This may vary for someone else’s process, however, so it’s still a good suggestion.

Reply

Thank you for your great post. You inspired me to try my hand at etching and design. I used your design as a base and modified it. Check out the details here http://www.3dprintmd.com/print/nanino-share-alike/ To summarize what I have done.

Original (where I got it from) http://www.meatandnetworking.com/projects/nanino-upgrade/. I actual original came from http://vonkonow.com/wordpress/2012/10/nanino-the-diy-friendly-arduino/
I added a 5v voltage regulator and supporting caps.
I added a 2 pin header for input on the unregulated side of the voltage regulator
I made the board two sided. Previously the traces on the top were wires. It will still work as a one sided board if you desire.
I added copper fills to the entire board.
Added registration marks for aligning the top an bottom
Added the name and version as a copper fill. I used version number 5 arbitrarily for my own tracking purposes
Standardized all holes to size #65 for easy drilling
Increased all pad sizes to .075 for easy soldering and to resolve pad lifting issued when soldering

Reply

Very cool! I’m glad you’ve had good luck with this!

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